What is the refrain in the poem the brook

what is the refrain in the poem the brook

What is the refrain in the poem "The brook " .What effect does it create ?

The refrain in Tennyson's "The Brook" is composed of two lines: For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. In his poems, Alfred Lord Tennyson skillfully composes the music of the. Jan 20,  · The refrain of the poem is ‘For men may come and men may go, hut I go on forever’. It shows the transitory. nature of human life and the eternal life of nature. Man is mortal and continues his journey till he meets his death. The brook on the other hand is .

I have some extra questions please give its answer. Please do not enter any spam link in the comment box. Home About us. Study Note. Home the brook summary The brook question answers the brook summary Class 12 The brook question answers the brook summary Class The brook question answers: Hello guys here you get the brook poem summary or critical analysis and question answers, ncert solution of class 12 alternative English vibgyor book.

Also, get a short summary of the poem brook by Alfred Lord Tennyson's video explanation in Hindi. All comprehension, extra and textual question answers of this poem given here. In the poem, the poet traces the journey of the brook or stream as it rushes down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below. The journey of the brook begins in the highest hill ranges, the dwelling places of aquatic birds like what to give for 50th wedding anniversary gifts and heron.

It makes a sudden movement and flows sparkling out among the ferns, bickering down a valley. The brook hurries down many hills, slips between the ridges and passes through many small villages, bridges, and a little town. It chatter on its stony path babbles with gurgling laughter like a child as it flows into eddying bays.

It flows by the farms of a man called Philip, fields in the brimming sunlight in a curving movement before it joins into an overflowing river.

As the brook continues its excited and happy journey amid the flora and fauna of the countryside, it carries the flower and foamy flake along and happily offers refuge to fishes like trout and grayling. In the course of the journey, the brook meets various obstacles like stone, pebbles, and 'golden how to cut in paint along ceiling. The forces of the current push all that comes it's way from the flower to sand particles, gravel, and stones.

It moves by lawns, grassy lands, hazel bushes, and those forget-me-nots that grow for lovers to cherish. The brook passes by the skimming swallows looking for insects and it dances majestically in the sunlight as it flows past its shallow sandy bank.

The brook flows through the thorny shrubs amidst the wilderness, pebbles, and plants like watercress creating a soft and low sound in the silence of night under the moonlight and stars.

Finally, it joins the brimming river - the final destination. The poet, through a series of what are the different types of tessellations images and onomatopoeic words, describes the movement of the brook and bring out certain universal truths which form the central idea of the poem: that human life is transitory, but the nature is eternal; that there is an end to every form of life, but the brook, a representation of nature, is everlasting.

This idea is expressed in the line which forms the refrain of the poem. But I go on forever". Where does the brook come from? Ans: The brook comes from the dwelling places of water birds like coot and heron. Whom does the brook want to join at the end of its journey? Ans: T he brook wants to join the overflowing river at the end of its journey. What are the flowers that grow near the brook? Ans: The sweet forget-me-nots, the bright blue flowers grow near the brook. Mention the name of the bird that flies above the brook?

Ans: The swallow, a swift flying songbird, lies above the brook. Where was the poet born? What does the brook do as it flows down? Ans: The brook how to bot bgs in wow out from the dwelling places of water birds like coot and heron. It makes a sudden movement and flows sparkling what is a briar patch among the ferns.

It bickers down a valley, slips between the ridges of hills, chatters aloud, bubbles, and babbles. Further, it steals quietly on grasslands, slides by the hazels moves aside the forget-me-nots, slips, glooms, glances, and murmurs under the night sky to finally join the brimming river.

Mention some of the words relating to sound scattered throughout the poem. Ans: The words relating to sound scattered throughout the poem 'The Brook' are - bicker, chatter, sharps and trebles, bubbles, babble, and murmur. Mention some words relating to movement in the poem.

Ans: Words relating to movement in the poem 'The Brook' are - sally, sparkle, slip, flow, eddying, wind, loiter, linger, dance, skimming, slide, gloom, glance, move, steal, draw, travel, sailing, come and go. What does the brook represent?

Human life or nature. Ans: In the poem, the brook represents nature. The brook, through its activities, shows that human life is temporary but nature is eternal. In human life, there is an end to every life but the brook having no end keeps on flowing ever and ever.

Ans: The lines refer to the movement of the brook. The brook flows through the thorny shrubs amidst the wilderness creating a soft and low sound in the silence of the night under the moonlight and stars.

Quote the refrain of the poem 'The Brook'. Explain it briefly. Ans: In a poem or song, the refrain is that part which repeated several times. The refrains in the poem 'The Brook' is. This refrain is replete with deep thought. The refrain further highlights the central idea of the poem and maintains its unity. Which lines in the poem compare the brook to a human being? Ans: The comparison is brought in the refrain.

These lines bring an effective contrast between the transient nature of human and eternal flow of nature, represented by the brook. Describe in brief the journey of the brook in the early part of the poem.

Ans: The journey of the brook begins in the highest hill ranges, the dwelling places of aquatic birds like coot and heron. It chatters on its stony path babbles with gurgling laughter like a child as it flows into eddying bays. Discuss in brief the beauty of nature as described by the poet in the poem. Ans: The poet Lord Tennyson in his poem 'The Brook' describes the beauty of nature at its best as he traces the journey of the brook rushing down from the remote hills to join the overflowing river in the valley below.

Further, it steals quietly on grasslands, slides by the hazels moves aside the forget-me-nots, slip, glooms, glances, and murmurs under the night sky to finally join the brimming river. Thus all through the poem, the poet has depicted the beauty what do you see a neurologist for nature in a picturesque and vivid way. How does the poet convey the central idea of the poem through the journey?

Ans: In the poem 'The Brook' the poet Lord Tennyson, describes the journey of the brook and brings out certain universal truths which form the central idea of the poem i.

Further, it steals quietly on grasslands, slides by the hazels move aside the forget-me-nots, slip, glooms, glances and murmurs under the night sky to finally join the brimming river.

This journey of the brook is a representation of nature is everlasting whereas human life is short-lived and transitory. This idea is clearly exhibited in the refrain of the poem.

What makes the brook sparkle? Ans: The brook sparkles because the rays which come from the sun fall on its watery surface. This surface reflects the sunlight and creates a sparkling effect.

What does coot and hern mean? Ans: 'Coot' means a small waterbird and 'hern' means freshwater and coastal birds with long-legged. Who is I referred to in the poem The Brook? Ans: Here 'I' is referred to the brook in the poem brook because the poet made the brook as the speaker of the poem. What does the brook take along with itself? Ans: The brook takes many things along with a journey like a blossom flowerlusty trout fishgrayling fishetc.

What flowers does the brook for happy lovers? Ans: Forget-me-not is the flower in the brook that grow for happy lovers. Related posts. The verger notes 2. Testament of walker notes 3. The scarecrow notes 4. The gift of magi notes 5. On not being a philosopher notes 6. Sita notes 7. The brook notes 8.

Ozymandias of Egypt notes 9. La belle dame sans merci notes Village song notes. Hopefully, you get the brook question answers and the brook summary. If you have any doubt please feel free to comment or contact us and please share it with your friends for their help. Facebook Twitter. Unknown 14 March at Menu Footer Widget. Home privacy policy Contact us About us.

The Full Text of “The Brook”

In 'The Brook', the poet uses the refrain - 'Men may come and men may go But I go on forever.' It signifies that man is mortal, but the brook is eternal as it keeps on flowing forever. The poet uses this refrain to emohasize the major difference between the brook and man. Jul 07,  · A summary of Tennyson's " The Brook " is a very straightforward thing once you realize that the poetic voice, or the speaker, in this simple allegorical poem is the personified brook . The refrain given above means that human beings are mortal and will have to die one day but the brook is immortal and would continue to flow for ages to come. A refrain is a phrase, verse, or group of verses repeated at intervals throughout a song or poem, especially at the end of each stanza.5/5(7).

The poem is a ballad in which the speaker—the brook, or stream, itself—undertakes a long and winding journey across the countryside to join up with a large river. Tucked inside this seemingly sweet poem about a little stream are darker, more poignant themes of death, human impermanence, and nature's indifference to humankind, though the poem also emphasizes nature's sheer beauty.

I come from haunts of coot and hern: I make a sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley. By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorps, a little town, And half a hundred bridges. I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow.

I chatter, chatter, as I flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling,.

And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel,. And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river; For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. I steal by lawns and grassy plots: I slide by hazel covers; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows;.

I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses; I linger by my shingly bars; I loiter round my cresses;. And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river; For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. Select any word below to get its definition in the context of the poem.

The words are listed in the order in which they appear in the poem. More Background — Read more about Tennyson's private and public life. Tennyson's Life — Read about how Tennyson's personal life shaped his work. Break, Break, Break. Crossing the Bar. Tears, Idle Tears. The Charge of the Light Brigade. The Kraken. The Lady of Shalott. Teachers and parents!

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The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. Sign Up. Already have an account? Sign in. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Sign In Sign Up. Literature Poetry Lit Terms Shakescleare. Download this LitChart! Question about this poem? Ask us. Cite This Page. The Brook Full Text. Lines It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Everything you need for every book you read. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive.

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